A Visual Stroll Through Small-Town Canada

Concept(s) Continuity and Change

Prepared for Grade(s) 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Province NB

By mark perry

Time Period(s) 1800-1900

Time allotment 2 periods X 60 minutes

Brief Description of the Task

Students will imagine that they are the local historians in the Town of Hampton and that they have been asked to write a chapter for a new book titled: A Visual History of Small Town Canada. The publishers have asked them to concentrate on the differences between life in the past and the present.

The students will examine a series of photographs taken in and around Hampton, NB from 1867-1918, and photographs taken of the same sites in February, 2007. They will make inferences about change and continuity of several aspects of life at this time: the society, the economy, the technology and the environment. Finally, they will write a chapter for the book that explains the changes and the continuity.

Objectives

Objectives for Historical Thinking

The students will be expected to

  • explain how some things continued and others changed, in Hampton, NB between the mid-1800's and 1916.
  • make reasonable inferences about the type and extent of changes over time,  identifying aspects of life that we ordinarily assume to be continuous and continuities in aspects of life we ordinarily assume to have changed over time.

Required Knowledge & Skills

It is important that students be involved in pre-task discussions or activities that explicitly explore the 'continuity and change' dimension.

Detailed Instructions

1. Ask students to imagine that they are the local historian in the Town of Hampton and that they have been asked to write a chapter for a new book titled: A Visual History of Small Town Canada. The publishers have asked them to concentrate on the differences and similarities between life in the past and the present.

2. Explain that the publishers have already done some research for them and found several photographs from the mid-1800's to the early 1900's and from the present as well. Their task will be to study these photographs carefully to decide what has changed and what has stayed the same and describe the type of any change. From ATT 1 small-town Canada show the first contrasting photographs to discuss and think aloud about the nature of change and continuity.

3. Distribute the visual organizer ATT 2 Continuity and Change in Hampton from 1867 to 2007. Use the following questions to guide students to a thorough and thoughtful analysis:

Questions focussing on change:

What kind of changes can you notice in the photographs from the past to the present? For each category what do these photographs clearly show us about change? What could you guess or infer about possible change?

How would you describe the kind of change? What adjectives would you use? Were the changes steady and gradual or were they swift and sudden? Were they widespread or spotty? deep or superficial?

How do you think different people might have experienced the changes? Did they welcome them or were they disturbed by them? Did some groups of people experience the changes in different ways?

Questions focussing on continuity:

What kind of things seemed to be the same in the photos from the past to the present?

What might explain why they stayed the same? (Though this can veer into causation – not a bad thing but not the focus of the lesson)

Were there any things that changed on the surface but underneath they mostly stayed the same?

Might some of the changes « recycle » and return to how they were in the past?

What kind of change was the change of the seasons? For the residents of Hampton would the seasons be an example of change or continuity?

4. When students have completed their visual organizer, introduce the assignment to write a chapter and ensure understanding of the rubric. If you wish to limit the length of writing, students could be asked to write on only one aspect of change.

 

Outcomes

The students will:

1. identify and use concepts associated with time,
continuity, and change

2. identify, evaluate, and use primary and secondary
sources to investigate historical questions

3. apply historical methodology to interpret and
understand time, continuity, and change at an
age-appropriate level

Rubric

What is a Benchmark?

<p>John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising &amp; Marketing History,<br />Duke University Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections</p>

A surveyor cut a "benchmark" into a stone or a wall when measuring the altitude and/or level of a tract of land. A bracket called a "bench" was secured in the cut to mount the surveying equipment, and all subsequent measurements were made in reference to the position and height of that mark.

The term "benchmark" was first used around 1842 to refer to a standard of quality by which achievement may be measured.

The foundation documents available through the Benchmarks site attempt to help teachers establish standards for assessing student learning of the modes of thought that constitute historical thinking.

John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History,
Duke University Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections