RMartinello's picture

I am currently the History/Geography head at St. Benedict Catholic Secondary School in Cambridge, Ontario. I teach History, Law and Civics. I am in my 26th year of teaching.

Using Simulations and Inquiry - The Nuremburg Trials

Ronald Martinello
26 Fév, 2014

As with James and Michael, this will be my last blog for the Historical Thinking Project. I have enjoyed reading the other blogs and the interesting approaches to teaching historical concepts. I am amazed by the thoughtful creativity I have seen and am encouraged by the directions that our practices our teaching has taken us. With that, I leave you with one last lesson.

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JMiles's picture

Historical Wrongs and Political Wins

James Miles
24 Fév, 2014

In this, my final blog post for the Historical Thinking Project, I hope to continue the conversation from my last post around the politics of the history curriculum. In this case, I am concerned with how students make sense of politicians’ attempts to redress historical injustices. More specifically, I have questions about how students consider the potential causes and consequences of politicians engaging in the ethical dimension of the past.

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MHarcourt's picture

Michael enseigne dans une école secondaire mixte au centre-ville de Wellington (Nouvelle-Zélande).

Stolpersteine: Stumbling over the past

Michael Harcourt
22 Fév, 2014

This will be my last blog for the Historical Thinking Project. Over the last year I have reflected and blogged about teaching that I have done, rather than what I would like to do. This post breaks that rule, which is why I have left it until now.

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MHarcourt's picture

Michael enseigne dans une école secondaire mixte au centre-ville de Wellington (Nouvelle-Zélande).

Jump starting historical thinking with Jenga

Michael Harcourt
5 Fév, 2014

This is a fun and engaging  2-3 lesson task I have developed  to start the year and introduce students to the kind of thinking they will need to do to be successful in history. It is an especially effective way to gain valuable diagnostic data on the complexity of students’ historical thinking. It can also help students who are new to the subject gain an understanding of the discipline.

Step 1: Give students two minutes or so to respond to each of these questions or statements silently on a piece of paper:

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JMiles's picture

Questioning Commemoration in the Classroom

James Miles
31 Jan, 2014

With 2014 barely a month old, it feels as if there has been an extraordinary amount of media attention on the past. Politicians and journalists are falling over each other to commemorate, condemn, comment on, and celebrate the various historical anniversaries that are occurring this year (and to question how they are taught in schools). The First World War centenary in particular has provoked extensive debate both here in Canada and around the world.

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Qu’est-ce qu’un « repère »?

<p>John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising &amp; Marketing History,  <br />Duke University Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections</p>

Selon les géologues, un repère (ou benchmark en anglais) est une marque faite sur un objet permanent dont la cote d'altitude est connue, par rapport à un niveau de référence officiel.

Un support (appelé bench en anglais) était encré dans la marque afin d’y installer l’instrument de mesure de l’arpenteur-géomètre. Toutes les références ultérieures étaient alors faites en fonction de ce repère.

L’emploi du terme « repère » pour signifier une norme de qualité (ou benchmark en anglais) est apparu pour la première fois en 1842.

Les documents de base que l’on trouve sur le site du projet Repères visent à aider les enseignants à établir des normes pour évaluer l’apprentissage, par les élèves, des modes de pensée qui constituent la réflexion historique.

John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History,
Duke University Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections