RMartinello's picture

I am currently the History/Geography head at St. Benedict Catholic Secondary School in Cambridge, Ontario. I teach History, Law and Civics. I am in my 26th year of teaching.

INCORPORATING HISTORICAL THINKING CONCEPTS INTO AN INQUIRY PROCESS

Ronald Martinello
22 Jan, 2014

The new Ontario curriculum calls for the integration of historical thinking concepts into our practice; it also calls for the integration of the inquiry model. While this is all fine and good, teachers are rarely given strategies of how to do this in our day to day lessons. The integration of the inquiry model produces some interesting challenges. Challenge one is making the move from teachers being deliverers of knowledge to facilitators of learning.  Challenge two is dealing with an extensive amount of content with limited time and resources.

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JMiles's picture

James Miles teaches Social Studies, I.B. History, and Social Justice 12 at West Vancouver Secondary School, where he has taught for six years.

A Month of Conference Simulations: Confederation, Versailles, Yalta & Potsdam

James Miles
15 Jan, 2014

The conference simulation can be a fun and valuable activity in a history classroom. Historical mock trials, conferences, and games have all found there way into the history classroom (Michael Harcourt recently wrote on this blog about his experiences working with mock trials). My question is, do they engender historical thinking?

Every December, I hope to explore this question by engaging my Grade 10, 11 & 12 students in various historical simulations. The students end the year imagining, playing, and interacting with historical actors.

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RMartinello's picture

I am currently the History/Geography head at St. Benedict Catholic Secondary School in Cambridge, Ontario. I teach History, Law and Civics. I am in my 26th year of teaching.

CONSTRUCTING HISTORY - THE EFFECT OF LIMITED EVIDENCE

Ronald Martinello
13 Jan, 2014

I had the privilege of working with a teacher who once taught me in high school. As my program head, I would often ask his advice on something new I was planning. His response would invariably be: “Try it. If it works, tell me about it. If it doesn’t, try something else.” As a young teacher at the time, I took that as a vote of confidence to experiment in my classes without fear of having a critical eye over my shoulders watching for every mistake. I share that with you because I tried a bit of a different approach to a lesson, and I am not sure if it worked or not.

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MHarcourt's picture

I teach in a large, co-educational, urban high school in downtown Wellington, New Zealand.

Mock trials in the history classroom?

Michael Harcourt
15 Dec, 2013

The last term before the summer holidays is usually a difficult one. The senior students have gone, everyone is counting down to the break and everything feels a little looser. There is a tendency to “tighten things up” and teachers are sometimes exhorted to “maintain control” and “not play too many videos”. I decided that this was a good time of the year to make social studies as practical as possible. We started a unit of learning on the criminal justice system and especially the pros and cons of jury service.

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RMartinello's picture

I am currently the History/Geography head at St. Benedict Catholic Secondary School in Cambridge, Ontario. I teach History, Law and Civics. I am in my 26th year of teaching.

USING AN INQUIRY APPROACH TO TEACH HISTORICAL THINKING CONCEPTS (CAUSE AND CONSEQUENCE)

Ronald Martinello
13 Dec, 2013

The new Ontario curriculum not only has an emphasis on teaching historical thinking, it also requires an inquiry based approach to teaching/learning. This is a lesson that attempts to meld the two through an examination of the effects of the Cold War. The historical thinking concept I wanted to examine was cause and consequence, more specifically I wanted to students to examine whether some of the consequences were Reactions or Over-reactions.

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What is a Benchmark?

<p>John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising &amp; Marketing History,<br />Duke University Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections</p>

A surveyor cut a "benchmark" into a stone or a wall when measuring the altitude and/or level of a tract of land. A bracket called a "bench" was secured in the cut to mount the surveying equipment, and all subsequent measurements were made in reference to the position and height of that mark.

The term "benchmark" was first used around 1842 to refer to a standard of quality by which achievement may be measured.

The foundation documents available through the Benchmarks site attempt to help teachers establish standards for assessing student learning of the modes of thought that constitute historical thinking.

John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History,
Duke University Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections